Building Muscle

Muscle growth (hypertrophy) is the development of mass, density, shape and function of muscle cells to adapt to exercise-induced stress.
______________________________________________________
There are two types; sarcoplasmic hypertrophy which increases the volume of fluid in the cell and myofibrillar hypertrophy which increases muscle size. I.e. bodybuilders often appear sarcoplasmic whereas a weightlifter would be myofibrillar.
______________________________________________________
The rate of muscle growth is dependant on the type of exercise, nutritional intake and hormonal status. Eat, train and recovery = you’ll grow muscle. Don’t eat, be sedentary and stressed = you’ll not grow muscle. Hormones: testosterone, growth hormone, IGF-1, cortisol, beta-endorphin and parathyroid hormone.
______________________________________________________
Men who gain muscle mass with moderate/low body fat will appear stronger and bigger. Women who gain muscle with moderate/ low body fat will appear tighter and firmer.
______________________________________________________
Weight training damages muscle fibres, so they have to repair stronger to meet the demands of the exercise-induced stress.
______________________________________________________
Restricting calories without resistance training leave you at risk of losing muscle mass and metabolic slow down (slow down, not damage). You need 2,800 calories to support protein turnover alongside training intensity. However, as long as a muscle is overloaded through resistance training it still can grow in a calorie restriction.
______________________________________________________
Muscle protein breakdown exceeds protein synthesis during rest, even with strength training we’re breaking down more than building up. Consumption of protein is then vital during protein turnover up to 48 hours post-exercise.
______________________________________________________
@ironathletegym @disciplined.fit

About The Author

Ben Hawksworth

No Comments

Leave a Reply

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close